Jump to content
The Talon House
Sign in to follow this  
movieguy

Katrina Threatens New Orleans' Historic Gay Distri

Recommended Posts

Katrina Threatens New Orleans' Historic Gay District

by 365Gay.com Newscenter Staff

Posted: August 29, 2005 11:00 am ET

(New Orleans, Louisiana) New Orleans' gay community appears to have heeded the warnings of mayor Ray Nagin and along with most others got out of the city as hurricane Katrina barreled down on the region.

The storm made landfall near Empire, Louisiana, shortly after 7 a.m. ET. Katrina weakened slightly - it is now listed as a category 4 storm - but is still packing winds up to 140 mph.

But, it is water not the wind that that is the biggest danger to lives and property. In a worst case scenario from the National Hurricane Center New Orleans could be under 20 feet of water by the time the storm passes.

Under that dire model the storm could wipe out the French Quarter. Officials say the centuries old buildings could not withstand the water damage and it could take a month to pump out the water. In some parts of the city there is already "total structural failure".

As heavy rains began drenching the city this morning water began rising in the historic, mostly gay French Quarter and winds blew sections off some roofs and tore signs from building fronts. Adding to concerns the weather office issued tornado warnings for the city and surrounding area.

Many of the larger hotels in the city remain open after hundreds of tourists were unable to flee. Hotel workers and their families were also invited to ride out the storm at a number of hotels.

In the French Quarter most guesthouses managed to transfer guests to the bigger hotels. Some of those hotels have emergency generators. Street lights remain on but electricity to most of the city is out.

Sunday, when the evacuation order went out several gay bars on Bourbon Street helped carless patrons arrange rides out of the city.

At the Superdome, an unknown number of gays hunkered down among the 10,000 other people unable to leave the city. Early this morning a section of the roof blew off. There were no injuries but officials are now concerned about the safety of the complex.

But not everyone in New Orleans heeded the warnings. By early morning three bodies had been recovered.

Officials are asking people not to call into the region. Land phone service in some parts of New Orleans is down and officials are worried cellular service could crash if there is an overload of the system by people checking on friends and relatives - a situation that could impede emergency services.

New Orleans is not the only area under attack. The storm shifted slightly to the east putting Biloxi, Mississippi in harms way. As it heads north it is also affecting Baton Rouge and is expected to be felt as far north as Tennessee.

©365Gay.com 2005

links

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Orleans' Historic Gay District Misses Most Of Katrina's Fury

by 365Gay.com Newscenter Staff

Posted: August 29, 2005 11:00 am ET

Updated: 1:00 pm ET, Updated 5:00 pm ET

(New Orleans, Louisiana) Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast Monday, but despite fears of catastrophic damage to the New Orleans' historic mostly gay French Quarter the area appeared late in the afternoon to avoided the brunt of the storm.

Most buildings sustained heavy water damage to their first floors but fears that 20 feet of water would inundate the Quarter failed to materialize.

The driving rain that accompanied the storm overflowed sewers with waste and refuse flowing down streets. The National Guard and emergency crews went through the area late in the afternoon and it appeared some buildings may need engineering inspections before they can be used. Thousands of windows have been blown out and the danger from falling glass remains.

Officials could not say when building and business owners would be allowed back into the area.

Other areas of city were not as fortunate. The south shore of Lake Pontchartrain was under about nine feet of water. A number of homes throughout the city have collapsed.

The city's gay community appears to have heeded the warnings of mayor Ray Nagin and along with most others got out of the city as hurricane Katrina barreled down on the region.

Many of the larger hotels in the city remain open after hundreds of tourists were unable to flee. Hotel workers and their families were also invited to ride out the storm at a number of hotels.

In the French Quarter most guesthouses managed to transfer guests to the bigger hotels. Some of those hotels have emergency generators. Street lights remain on but electricity to most of the city is out.

Sunday, when the evacuation order went out several gay bars on Bourbon Street helped carless patrons arrange rides out of the city.

At the Superdome, an unknown number of gays hunkered down among the 10,000 other people unable to leave the city. Early this morning a section of the membrane roof blew off. There were no injuries but officials are now concerned about the safety of the complex.

But not everyone in New Orleans heeded the warnings. By early morning three bodies had been recovered.

Officials are asking people not to call into the region. Land phone service in some parts of New Orleans is down and officials are worried cellular service could crash if there is an overload of the system by people checking on friends and relatives - a situation that could impede emergency services.

©365Gay.com 2005

links

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...