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TomasG

Of Barriers and Giant Underground Machines

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About the barrier... I had previously pointed out (in one of the lost posts) that fences, walls, and barriers serve two purposes. To keep something or someone out and also to keep something or someone in.

The thought has occurred to me that the barrier may have originally been raised to keep the surviving remnants of the human population from the rest of the continent out of Altinestra so as to protect the Icanian and Kalorians that remained. Perhaps that was the plan to save all or as many as possible.

Remember, the the period of sleep was supposed to be only for 100 years. Well within the lifetime of the Icarians that weren't put to sleep. I don't think that the longevity of the Kalorians has ever been mentioned, but the Kalorian species would have survived. That being said, it has been 2500 years not 100 years so the question is 'what and who has survived that length of time?' The Kalorian species would likely have because they are able to procreate, but what about the Icarians.

Now... about that giant machine.

If you recall the Emperor's ambition and plan was to expand the Empire by conquering the Commonwealth one planet at a time. That was the real purpose in creating an army of Thrones.

From Book 2, Chapter 39

The emperor barked out a deep, understanding laugh. “Remember Savaron, our goal remains unchanged. Although we’re not sure what we’ll find on Altinestra when we emerge, we’ll have a formidable army at our command; even, dare I say, an invincible one? And I intend to use them. Given all our careful preparations, it should be possible.”

“I can assure you that it will be quite possible, my Emperor.”

“Don’t think I’ve forgotten your hand in this, my dear friend.” The Emperor’s smile never reached his eyes. “With the exogates blocked by the Commonwealth, your back-up plan grows more attractive every day. I look forward to seeing the look on their faces once we unleash the power we’ve been hiding. I dare say it’s been tempting. I don’t like sitting on my hands while the bloody Commonwealth makes us look like eunuchs. It will be a vengeful treat to wield the knife that emasculates them.”

But, in order to accomplish that goal there had to be someway for that army to be able to get to the planets in the Commonwealth, and the only way that could be done was by exogate and the Commonwealth had shut them down.

It may well be that the giant underground machine at Overland Flats is at the least a super powerful exogate capable of either overriding and reactivating the exogates on the other planets or directly transporting the Throne army to any planet in the Commonwealth, thereby allowing the Thrones to invade and conquer that planet. An unknown factor is what Jamie may have done to the machine or at least the controls when Renaud took and left him there in Chapter 38.

Speculation, speculation, speculation... isn't it fun. LOL

TomasG

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I'm sure the Kalorian population is alive and thriving, that is providing that the germ that the empire was planning to release, wasn't. As for the Icarians that we've come to know and love, I doubt they survived 2500 years. And if they did, I doubt they look any thing like they did. We know they were engineered to live longer, but not that long.

As for that machine, it could be some kind of weapon. Let's not forget that besides the exogates being shut down, the planet was also under a blockade to keep them from building ships to get off the planet.

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Now that is the other side of the same coin. It may be that the virus was released and the barrier was raised to protect the Kalorians that were elsewhere, other than Altinestra, from the virus. In that case, there may well be no one and nothing but ruins behind the barrier unless, as pietro suggested, the giant machine was in fact turned into a giant stasis generating unit capable of covering Altinestra and the Icarians survived.

Jamie's statement at the end of Book 2, Chapter 14

“Now, Charles Roegier, ühn•ki’sh’onfenn of the Sh’ônfenn,” I said without any emotion as I gave him a cold, unblinking stare, “give me one good reason why I shouldn’t avenge ten thousand deaths right now. Tell me, why I shouldn’t kill you on the very spot where you stand?”

would seem to lend some credence that the virus was released.

I would speculate that the Sh’ônfenn would have been the ideal agent to release the virus, whether it was Charles or one of Loka's agents within the Sh’ônfenn.

TomasG

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That's the biggest question we've been waiting to get the answer to. Just how soon we get that answer, only Jamies knows. I do know of one burning question that we will learn the answer to, but I don't know the answer.

I would have to think it was Loka who had it released.

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Snip... I would have to think it was Loka who had it released.

I quite sure that it was Loka that ordered the release, if indeed it was released. I was just commenting that he probably had it done through his agents in the Sh’ônfenn. I would hazard a guess that Charles had nothing to do with it. He probably knew about the virus, but likely didn't even know that it had been ordered released, but since he is the head honcho he gets the blame, whether or not he deserves it.

TomasG

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Hhhmmm.

The release of the virus was already scheduled in the Empire's 'Retreat to Argon' plan, so if the evacuation actually took place, even partially, then it would have been released, however I still think Renaud kills the Emperor and the evacuation and all that goes with it is thwarted.

I don't think Jamie's comment of ten thousand deaths necessarily would refer to the virus, the Empire was blood-thirsty enough to have killed millions over the years and the Sh’ônfenn were the Empire's enforcers, but you could well be right.

Perhaps it was released and that was why the stasis units were reset for 2000 years, but hold on, Charlie has already been put in stasis so his unit would reset after one hundred years. It has always puzzled me how such widely dispersed units could all have been reset, made even more puzzling by the fact that some were markedly different, Charlie's and Lance/Matthew, some were installed by the Empire and some were installed by various factions of the resistance.

I now think it must have been Jamie using his Time-Turner powers, why it became necessary I have no idea. Of course the simple answer would be that the units required confirmation at the end of their set sequence and simply continued operating until that was received or power level deterioration forced the issue, but in that case there would have had to have been certainty that someone was available to issue the confirmation, which couldn't be assured, so that rather kills that.

We will just have to wait.

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There's always the possibility that during the programing phase of the status units, a hidden program was installed at the same time. Once the units were activated, the new program took over. I think an example of that is the worm that Charles had planted, thru the net, into Jamie that we have no idea what it was to do.

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Something else I've thought of and it's one of those what if's.

For maximum effect, I would think that they would have the Kalorian virus hidden in different places to be dispersed over large areas, thus insuring maximum coverage. These canisters could be set to release at the push of a button.

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It's very clear that the Kalorians did survive in Taldor Valoren. It is also clear that someone who survived the plague owned the winery, Domain Carolus. Domain Carolus is far to the North of the barrier and where the Ghadar were hidden. Another thing is quite clear from the narrative; there was trade between the farmers of Taldor Valoren and the Green Valley (Part of one of the surviving countries. So, the Kalorians were not unknown in the rest of the continent, they were just not known by the official rulers of the countries. They had assumed that it was a desolate place of death.

It seems there was a huge disconnect between those ruling those countries and what was really going on. Not even the Sarjanus church knew about Taldo Valoren nor the trade that took place between the small mountain hide away and the rest of the farming communities of the continent. How many Kalorians were blended into the human population of the land during the 2500 years? Barcepa must have spoken both Kalorian and the common language of the continent as well. There is much going on in the background about which the rulers of the countries remain completely ignorant.

Now on the subject of the fate of the planned exodus to Argon, two things may have put a monkey wrench into those plans; first, Jamies attack on those who threatened his mate, Niklas. It seems it was quite destructive, though we do not know how destructive. We also do not know how what Jamie did affected the spread of the plague. It is entirely possible that the human population behind the barrier was completely wiped out.

We've also left out the Monastery and the Tower of Agromon. Neither of these items are of human origin, and we do not know who put them there. Jamie and Charlie are the only ones who know what is written there. There is something quite astounding written on the Monastery walls which no one in the Empire save perhaps, Croal, ever understood. Even Charles doesn't know.

We have an unfinished story and not enough evidence to even hazard a guess at what happens in the end. We have not one, but two cliff hangers currently plus all those enigmatic conversations who's subject we are not quite sure of. Off hand I can think of at least tow or three of those. How can we even guess?

I've given up guessing and during the wait for other chapters I've been reading other stories. Most of them not nearly as good as TSOI. The ones I keep going back to, however, are David MacLeod's stories from his "translations" of the "Book of Heros". (David McLeod's stories are on Gay Authors). People from this earth have been transfered by some gate to another place, a world where Magic exists. There is no religion, one is either working for the light or for the dark. These stories are utterly unlike TSOI so don't expect a continuing saga, These are just some stories about a place called "World".

Others, like "I Am Not From Earth", I really disliked. I don't like Cinderella where Cinderella goes back to sit in the ashes.

cheers,

dioscuri

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What we know about Taldor Valoran, we've learned after the Icarians woke from stasis. Apparently, the valley was known during the time of the Empire as Jamie used a gate to take Brotus there and Ludewik and Barsetba home. It's possible that some of the Kalorians fled to the valley and stayed there. Then during the great cleanseings, it was thought the valley was inhabitable so the plague victims were driven there to die. Now that I think about it, we have a possible place to find more stasis units.

Given the mating bond, and Jamie's temper, I think we can expect a very explosive situation when it comes to Castle Rood.

At the risk of going off topic, I've worked with David on his 'Book of Hero's' series. At one point, he was offered and accepted Hosted Author status at Gay Authors. He eventually backed out of the offer due to health concerns.

Dan Kirk has some excellent sci-fi/fantasy stories, like his Do Over series, Sins of the Father, Rich Boy series, The Riders Pride, and others.

Then there's Alan Smithee with his Valdemar FanFiction, Tests of Blood.

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What we know about Taldor Valoran, we've learned after the Icarians woke from stasis. Apparently, the valley was known during the time of the Empire as Jamie used a gate to take Brotus there and Ludewik and Barsetba home. It's possible that some of the Kalorians fled to the valley and stayed there. Then during the great cleanseings, it was thought the valley was inhabitable so the plague victims were driven there to die. Now that I think about it, we have a possible place to find more stasis units.

Given the mating bond, and Jamie's temper, I think we can expect a very explosive situation when it comes to Castle Rood.

At the risk of going off topic, I've worked with David on his 'Book of Hero's' series. At one point, he was offered and accepted Hosted Author status at Gay Authors. He eventually backed out of the offer due to health concerns.

Dan Kirk has some excellent sci-fi/fantasy stories, like his Do Over series, Sins of the Father, Rich Boy series, The Riders Pride, and others.

Then there's Alan Smithee with his Valdemar FanFiction, Tests of Blood.

I've always assumed, without any actual evidence, that Taldor Valoren was most likely an Imperial holding - sort of an Imperial (Hunting) Forest or Imperial Retreat, that kind of thing. It would certainly be a typical contender for that kind of thing, isolated, pristine, salubrious, i.e. a highly desirable get away place. Thus there would have been a resident, probably majority, Kalorian staff already in a good and safe position to try to preserve as much civilisation as possible while the Icarians were in stasis.

We know that the residents of Domain Carolus were Kalorian in origin, and we can reasonably assume the Vosh were also, given their cultural connection to the Prison of Pain. In fact I would say that the majority of the present population were probably of Kalorian stock, whether they realise it or not. As with most Empires the 'master' population, in this case human, would have been concentrated in the cities while the great majority of the country dwellers would be from the 'lower' races, Kalorian in this case. Note that Jamie's home of Isewier was almost 100% Kalorian, the human nobility, army and whatever rarely left Imperialis, the regional capital. The workers, overseers, managers and even research staffs were all Kalorian. The rules governing normal population change/adjustment would suggest that after the fall of a civilisation on the Altinestran scale the majority of survivors would have been from rural areas. Especially as I doubt very much there were any Kalorians at the time willing to help the dispossessed and plague-ravaged human element.

The difference with those in Taldor Valoren, Domain Carolus and by implication the Farzeti who may have been human rather than Kalorian, and probably others we know nothing of as yet, is really only in that they know their geneology and also had specific duties/responsibilities to pass on through subsequent generations. The Vosh don't quite come into this for all they have strong cultural Kalorian roots, re the prison of pain, they seem to have lost much of their geneological history, not surprising given their nomadic life.

I also like most of Dan Kirks writing, as well as Alan Smithy and David MacLeod. I thought Dio Beckstead's two stories were the best sci/fi on that site, unfortunately real life captured him and he has been gone for several years now.

If you like Tolkienesque writing I would suggest you read this author: C M Denton. "The Lays of Morèyar" is presumably a trilogy currently in writing. The first book, 'The Children of Akka' is available on the link, and in paperback via Amazon et al, the second book 'The Ascension and the End' is on the link and nearing completion. Highly recommended.

Edited by pietro

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The Vosh are of Kalorian decent tho they may not acknowledge it. We know there was several resistance cells within the Kalorian populace, each with their own agenda. They were brought together for one reason. I suspect that when things settled down, one group saw their chance to break away and go their own way, so they did. They also managed to keep some legends alive the whole time.

Funny you should mention Dio. He's one of the authors that I've worked with in the past. I worked on Pegasus and AJ worked on Greyeyed Justice. Dio is still around and from what I understand, is a professional writer.

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In Book 2, Chapter 35 we have this:

"What do you think it is?"

"I'd rather not say," Jamie leaned forward until his body tugged against the straps of his seat harness. "But can you tell me if in any of the Emperor's presentations there was mention of an energy field? Or if the words reverse threshold were ever mentioned?

"Not that I recall, but there was something said about reverse passage."Jamie simply nodded while continuing to study the device.

If this machine in the cavern is the generator of the barrier, then we could assume that people, or objects, can go outside the barrier but they can't enter. We know that Jamie downloaded something into its computer control, probably giving him control of it once it was activated. So if the Emperor was lucky enough to escape to Argon, I don't think he was able to get back.

It's also possible that it was only meant to protect the tenth hill as Hippolito seemed to be aware of it when he met with Abbot Gude. But I don't think he's aware of what Jamie's done with it.

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What we know about Taldor Valoran, we've learned after the Icarians woke from stasis. Apparently, the valley was known during the time of the Empire as Jamie used a gate to take Brotus there and Ludewik and Barsetba home. It's possible that some of the Kalorians fled to the valley and stayed there. Then during the great cleanings, it was thought the valley was inhabitable so the plague victims were driven there to die. Now that I think about it, we have a possible place to find more stasis units.

Given the mating bond, and Jamie's temper, I think we can expect a very explosive situation when it comes to Castle Rood.

Remember that Jamie did something with the huge generator under construction. Exactly what his plan was I don't know, but I have a feeling that what ever it was he did, will ultimately interfere with something the empire has planned since the generation plant has security employees watching it closely. Since Jamie has co-opted it, it seems to be destined to be used during the transfer of the Kalorians and/or any Icarians it is also possible that he has used it to power the shield in place South of the mountains.

So this is another of those puzzles which we await the author's writing.

At the risk of going off topic, I've worked with David on his 'Book of Hero's' series. At one point, he was offered and accepted Hosted Author status at Gay Authors. He eventually backed out of the offer due to health concerns.

That is truly unfortunate. His writing seems very simple at first, but I found that I have kept returning to the stories again and again, and enjoying them, finding new things I'd missed. His concept of magic as a part of our physical universe and subject to the laws of physics is something I had not thought of. That magic may be a physical expression in the universe like light, energy, magnetism is very alluring.

That life evolved only on earth and was transported through doors or wormholes seemingly with some sort of intelligence controlling it is also fascinating. Seeing that more than a few North American native human races seem to have legends about these doors or worm holes lends credence to the possibility.

It is also unusual that World is without a religion and has no creation stories or stories and legends about God or gods is also interesting. Hopefully there is a chance that the author will pick up writing at some point -- even at a much slower pace -- would be welcome.

I've read some of Dan Kirk's writing and have found it interesting but always racing towards some sort of resolution except none is ever found and his heros or subjects of his writing never seem to find any sort of resolution to their situations. Perhaps I have not continued reading far enough, but all his characters seem to always be in turmoil.

Compared to TSOI, I could very well imagine Jamie and Niklas finding nothing at Kuronos and simply continuing with Altinestra completely leaving Loren out of the picture, finally showing the Sarjanian religion along with Hippolito as the frauds and hypocrites they really are and working into some sort of relationship with the Zakarias, the Ghroum or another Kingdom on the planet. Not so with Dan Kirk's characters, they seem always in the middle of a storm which shows no signs of ending.

I did find the Dragon Earl Series which is finished but remains open ended and with the possibility of more stories -- even by different authors. Dragon Earl was a bit a surprise. I did not think I'd like it as well as I did. Again, I keep my fingers crossed.

On Gay Authors I am a bit perplexed by the number of unfinished stories and so try to look carefully for authors who finish stories and series.

The nice thing about TSOI is that we are assured that the author has a game plan and that the story has an ending already planned and laid out. The best writers work like that. Even Tolkien's who's work took a life time to write, began with his work on language and the creation of the Elvish Language. As Tolkien explained, all languages are the result of a history and so the stories of LOTR are the result --- actually the end of the history of the Elves on earth (where they were apparently not meant to live as corporeal beings permanently). He knew the end as he was writing or creating the beginning.

You know, I did not read LOTR in order. I would frequently jump from place to place and eventually from book to book. As I've stated before some parts of it seem to be separate entities in themselves (like the story of Aragorn and Arwen), but with TSOI I cannot do that, so I have to be content with reading it in the order the author posts. It is a completely new genre in that way.

cheers,

dioscuri

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At the risk of going off topic, I've worked with David on his 'Book of Hero's' series. At one point, he was offered and accepted Hosted Author status at Gay Authors. He eventually backed out of the offer due to health concerns.

I was just re-rereading Translator II and came across the end notes where your name is mentioned as assisting with Translator III (which sadly doesn't exist at this point), I really did want to know more about Phillip and his relationship with that Dragon.

It seems the writing I seem to like, is writing in which the author really develops his all his characters not just the main protagonists. Despite the story being an action thriller or a ultra-long sci-fi/Fantasy novel, these authors seem to be able to allow even the smallest and most inconsequential character to become real to the reader.

In terms of TSOI, of course we are deeply involved with Jamie and Niklas, but I find that even characters like General Zakaria and Miro take on multi-dimensional characteristics, more usually found in characters who are of at least secondary importance. In both of the cases I've just mentioned, the author has given these characters depth and feeling which is unexpected. That's what separates the best authors from those who are almost but not quite there.

In TSOI, I've mentioned two characters specifically, but there are many more who have taken on a life of their own and who's welfare we, the reader care about. Its also what makes the stories worth a second and third reading where others get only one.

cheers,

dioscuri

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It seems the writing I seem to like, is writing in which the author really develops his all his characters not just the main protagonists.

I couldn't agree more. The book I found with the most excellent characterisation was Frank Herbert's 'Dune'. That was the first book I read multiple times, and will read again, in fact, it is the only book where I literally turned from the last page and started again at the first page. And I enjoyed it even more the second time. If it hadn't been for one of my teachers giving it to me one day with an 'I think you would this' I might never have read it. He also leant me the 'Sot Weed Factor', another excellent book.

Well, having helped take the forum completely off topic I had better go.

But first as a little redress, I also agree Jamie.wri provides excellent characterisation, not quite the level Frank Herbert achieved with 'Dune', but then, Herbert himself rarely did so, only, I think, with 'The Dragon in the Sea', but it is a long time since I have read it and maybe I was thinking of 'The Eyes of Heisenberg'.

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It seems the writing I seem to like, is writing in which the author really develops his all his characters not just the main protagonists.

I couldn't agree more. The book I found with the most excellent characterisation was Frank Herbert's 'Dune'. That was the first book I read multiple times, and will read again, in fact, it is the only book where I literally turned from the last page and started again at the first page. And I enjoyed it even more the second time. If it hadn't been for one of my teachers giving it to me one day with an 'I think you would this' I might never have read it. He also leant me the 'Sot Weed Factor', another excellent book.

Well, having helped take the forum completely off topic I had better go.

But first as a little redress, I also agree Jamie.wri provides excellent characterisation, not quite the level Frank Herbert achieved with 'Dune', but then, Herbert himself rarely did so, only, I think, with 'The Dragon in the Sea', but it is a long time since I have read it and maybe I was thinking of 'The Eyes of Heisenberg'.

The fly in the ointment here is that TSOI remains unfinished so we cannot compare the success or failure of jamie.wri. Jamie.wri's Ace is that he is a skilled (professional) technical writer. Of all writing skills, I think that is the most difficult one to master. One must be able to step away from the subject and see it as others would see it, assist them in understanding it in a way which assists them in using the description or set of instructions to get full value from what ever is being written about.

In every chapter so far, Jamie.wri has shown his skill in this area of writing and it has given this complex work a kind of clarity which is difficult to manage. It took Tolkein a lifetime to almost accomplish. As we know, he left a large amount of work unfinished. That said, he did not even set out to write the Lord of the Rings, only to set out a history for the language he created in his role as Professor of Philology.

Frank Herbert's Dune is another story. He lived not 200 miles from where I live in some of the wettest temperate rain forest in the world! Odd that he should write about a Desert planet. However, I digress, in fact, Dune was totally awe inspiring, I loved it as soon as I began reading it. However, the sequels to the first book never captured quite the magic the first book did. I can't say why because I could never finish reading them!

I think we must wait for TSOI to be complete before we make any kind of comparisons. The only thing I can say is that anyone I've recommended TSOI to who've actually read it are as taken with it as I am.

As I await the next installment of TSOI, I am reading about Dragons. There are none of those in TSOI that I know of, so no comparisons!

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The fly in the ointment here is that TSOI remains unfinished so we cannot compare the success or failure of jamie.wri. Jamie.wri's Ace is that he is a skilled (professional) technical writer. Of all writing skills, I think that is the most difficult one to master. One must be able to step away from the subject and see it as others would see it, assist them in understanding it in a way which assists them in using the description or set of instructions to get full value from what ever is being written about.

I would just like to say I am not in any way disparaging Jamie.wri as an author. TSOI is right up there with the greats of sci/fi and Jamie.wri is certainly able to stand with Arthur C Clarke, Asimov, Niven et al.

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I think our biggest clue to the barrier came to us in Book 2, Part 1 - The Golden Orb, Chapter 4. Just after absorbing the golden orb, Jamie reconstructs the giant map table, including the missing piece, Altinestra (Icaria).

"And here" I said quietly, "within the land of Taldor Valoren, is the mountain trail that leads to the pass and tunnel that will take us to Icaria. And it is there, just past the entrance of that tunnel, that we will find the circle of Ondra on the plain of Zarkistan, and the wall of protection surrounding the Kingdom of Altinestra that only the true wizard can open." At the mention of Taldor Valoren, I could see Lüdowik's eye widen as he stepped forward to get a better view.

Given the size of Altinestra, it would take quite a lot of power to generate a barrier of that size.

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I think our biggest clue to the barrier came to us in Book 2, Part 1 - The Golden Orb, Chapter 4. Just after absorbing the golden orb, Jamie reconstructs the giant map table, including the missing piece, Altinestra (Icaria).

"And here" I said quietly, "within the land of Taldor Valoren, is the mountain trail that leads to the pass and tunnel that will take us to Icaria. And it is there, just past the entrance of that tunnel, that we will find the circle of Ondra on the plain of Zarkistan, and the wall of protection surrounding the Kingdom of Altinestra that only the true wizard can open."

Given the size of Altinestra, it would take quite a lot of power to generate a barrier of that size.

TalonRider, you are absolutely right! And congratulations on being able to show how stepping back from a first reading, then looking at a single sentence again, can give so much added meaning!

I had seen that Jamie standing there in the Council chambers and in essence giving a lecture on Altinestran history, but had not seen the full importance of the statement about only the true Wizard of Icaria being able to unlock and pass the wall of protection. It seems that there is some mechanism in place that will weed out pretenders to the roll of Wizard even before presenting at the Tower of Agramon in thee Circle of Ondra for the Ceremonial Inspection. For obvious reasons Loran cannot pass because he will arrive without a bonded mate. Jamie, however, even if he arrives by himself without Niklas actually present, will be recognized as Wizard because he has a bonded mate who can become King.

Here is where Alexander himself may still play a roll, even after his death (physical death that is). In some way, Alexander may still be able to shape the future of Icaria! Likely his love for Loran will be the way in which he removes his mate from the competition for Wizard of Icaria. Alexander needs to be reunited with his bonded mate, as does Loran. Perhaps it is that Loran will not be able to resist Alexander's call to him.

Oh my! here i go again, trying to second guess an author! Alexander cannot be happy to have had his life ended early by Hippolito. Alexander will want justice at least (and perhaps regenge as well) for his murder! Against the ghost of Alexander, Hippolito cannot prevail. You cannot kill a ghost!

In any case, only a true Wizard can unlock Icaria. A true Wizard has a bonded mate who will be King. Can the end of this part of the story be this simple? It has been said that the simplest solution is always the best and/or correct one! I have experienced that principal at work many times myself. The simpler the solution the more elegant it is. The scientist Croal would appreciate the meaning of my last statement!

The last piece of the puzzle is always the easiest to put in place!

cheers, and light

dioscuri

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TalonRider, you are absolutely right! And congratulations on being able to show how stepping back from a first reading, then looking at a single sentence again, can give so much added meaning!

I had seen that Jamie standing there in the Council chambers and in essence giving a lecture on Altinestran history, but had not seen the full importance of the statement about only the true Wizard of Icaria being able to unlock and pass the wall of protection. It seems that there is some mechanism in place that will weed out pretenders to the roll of Wizard even before presenting at the Tower of Agramon in thee Circle of Ondra for the Ceremonial Inspection. For obvious reasons Loran cannot pass because he will arrive without a bonded mate. Jamie, however, even if he arrives by himself without Niklas actually present, will be recognized as Wizard because he has a bonded mate who can become King.

Here is where Alexander himself may still play a roll, even after his death (physical death that is). In some way, Alexander may still be able to shape the future of Icaria! Likely his love for Loran will be the way in which he removes his mate from the competition for Wizard of Icaria. Alexander needs to be reunited with his bonded mate, as does Loran. Perhaps it is that Loran will not be able to resist Alexander's call to him.

Oh my! here i go again, trying to second guess an author! Alexander cannot be happy to have had his life ended early by Hippolito. Alexander will want justice at least (and perhaps regenge as well) for his murder! Against the ghost of Alexander, Hippolito cannot prevail. You cannot kill a ghost!

In any case, only a true Wizard can unlock Icaria. A true Wizard has a bonded mate who will be King. Can the end of this part of the story be this simple? It has been said that the simplest solution is always the best and/or correct one! I have experienced that principal at work many times myself. The simpler the solution the more elegant it is. The scientist Croal would appreciate the meaning of my last statement!

The last piece of the puzzle is always the easiest to put in place!

cheers, and light

dioscuri

Hhhmmm, I think maybe that is a bit optimistic, after all, from what we apparently know both Jamie and Loran have to be in the Circle of Ondra. That said, I seem to recall that the 'key' for the barrier is in Taldor Valoran, whether Loran knows that or not I can't remember. Still it is not too long before we find these things out, I hope :rolleyes:

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The key, I believe is that glowing rod that Lon Aldoran is in possesion of. It's the comm device that Jamie used to program the machine with and is keyed to his DNA. If Loran does know about it, I don't think he will be able to use it. Loran may know about the tunnel thru the mountains and that is why he's going to go thru Taldor Valoran.

I think the Circle of Ondra is one of two places mentioned where the orbs were meant to be absorbed by the wizard. I believe the survivor will only have hours to then to absorb the orbs in the correct order or die. For Jamie and Charlie, that is a moot point as they don't need the orbs.

The orbs were designed to accept only someone of the High Seraphic class. Someone of the Royal Dominion Class could not safely absorb them.

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The key, I believe is that glowing rod that Lon Aldoran is in possesion of.{b]It's the comm device that Jamie used to program the machine with and is keyed to his DNA.[/b] If Loran does know about it, I don't think he will be able to use it. Loran may know about the tunnel thru the mountains and that is why he's going to go thru Taldor Valoran.I think the Circle of Ondra is one of two places mentioned where the orbs were meant to be absorbed by the wizard. I believe the survivor will only have hours to then to absorb the orbs in the correct order or die. For Jamie and Charlie, that is a moot point as they don't need the orbs.The orbs were designed to accept only someone of the High Seraphic class. Someone of the Royal Dominion Class could not safely absorb them.

The com device and the object that Lan Aldoran has appear to be two different objects.

From Book2, Chapter 38:

Jamie slowly lifted the lid. Inside was a jumble of personal effects, but nestled among them was a thin cylindrical piece of metal. Although small, its weight was surprising for its size, for packed inside was an array of the finest and most advanced technology the Altinestran Empire had to offer.

And from Book 1, Interlude 1, Silver:

The strange piece of metal had been in the library for as long as he could remember. It belonged to his father, and his grandfather before him. In fact, as far as he knew, it had been in the possession of the Aldorian clan for hundreds of years. About a foot in length and an inch square on all four of its sides, it had delicate and highly detailed carvings etched across every surface. The patterns were not figures or even designs Lan recognized, but were instead strange swirling loops, bits of curves and an occasional half circle. On one end of the bar a large hole had been drilled into it. The hole had been tapped to form threads as if something were meant to be screwed into it so that it could be affixed to some larger object.

Perhaps Jamie embedded the small cylindrical electronic device in the bar of metal that Lan Aldoran has as a way to keep it from getting lost, or if they are one in the same, there is another explanation for the inconsistency in the descriptions. I think that the metal bar that Lan Aldoran has is the key to the barrier or at least a part of some mechanism to shut the barrier down, but the small electronic device is for a different purpose.

We know that Jamie coded the small cylindrical device to his DNA, but we don't know at this point what else he programmed into it at the informatics station in the library or what he modifications he may have made to it or to the console at the machine. It occurs to me that Jamie programmed it and the console so that a signal would be sent to him over the net that the machine had been activated and he could then send a signal back that would shut it down and prevent its use. (A little sabotage perhaps?). :)

Edited by TomasG

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Ah, but that would assume the Big Bad Machine is is the generator for the barrier, which it may not be.

Either my intellect is failing me or we simply don't have enough information/clues to make a reasoned guess.

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Ah, but that would assume the Big Bad Machine is is the generator for the barrier, which it may not be.Either my intellect is failing me or we simply don't have enough information/clues to make a reasoned guess.

Nope. Not what I said.

It occurs to me that Jamie programmed it and the console so that a signal would be sent to him over the net that the machine had been activated and he could then send a signal back that would shut it down and prevent its use. (A little sabotage perhaps?).

Being able to shut it down when it is activated, at least to me, would be to sabotage the plans of the Emperor and Loka, and to prevent them from using it for whatever purpose they had it built. At this point, my inclination is that the machine has nothing to do with the barrier and all to do with the Emperor and his favorites escaping to Argon and his ambition to conquer the Commonwealth.

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